About Kristin Griffin, Freek Berson & Dr. Benny Tritsch

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So far Kristin Griffin, Freek Berson & Dr. Benny Tritsch has created 2 blog entries.

OneDrive for Business Performance in Non-Persistent Environments Using FSLogix’s Office 365 Containers

An Independent Remote End-User Experience Performance Benchmark

Based on this Microsoft knowledge base article, “the OneDrive for Business sync app isn’t supported for client sessions that are hosted on Windows 2008 Terminal Services or Windows 2012 Remote Desktop Services (RDS).“ This is also true for RDS running on Windows Server 2016. In order to gain access to OneDrive for Business files, Remote Desktop users have to utilize a web browser.

FSLogix Office 365 Containers however, does support roaming OneDrive for Business cache. So RDS Gurus decided to test the user experience of remote desktop users working with OneDrive for Business in an RDS environment configured to use FSLogix Office 365 Containers. Like our past Outlook testing, we did this by collecting performance metrics as well as video footage of a series of RDS user sessions designed to simulate users working in OneDrive for Business.

Benchmarking Setup

We used the same environment and lab for these test runs as we did for our previous Outlook testing, so refer to that article for the benchmarking setup. Our test steps were also the same, except that we created test sequences and Uber-exes that ran OneDrive for Business workloads. […]

Outlook Performance in Non-Persistent Environments Using FSLogix’s Office 365 Containers

An Independent Remote End-User Experience Performance Benchmark

RDS Gurus decided to run performance tests on Outlook in non-persistent environments using FSLogix’s Office 365 Containers solution. We wanted to illustrate the user experience of remote desktop users working in an RDS environment configured to use FSLogix Office 365 Containers relative to the typical user experience when using native RDS UPD technology. Our primary focus was to measure how performance degrades when multiple users are simultaneously working with Outlook (“noisy neighbor effect”).

We did this by collecting performance metrics as well as video footage of a series of test runs where users in remote sessions “worked” in Outlook 2016. All the work was automated. Users opened Outlook and conducted a series of searches that queried the local windows search service (queries against All Mailboxes, All Outlook Items or Subfolders) and queried the Office 365 server search service (queries against current folder and mailbox).

We recorded the on-screen user experience of a primary user, and also collected performance counter data during each test run. In some runs only the primary user taxed the system. In other runs, we introduced a number of secondary users who also “worked” in Outlook. We conducted our tests in an on-premises […]